First Person

When my student was assaulted and traumatized, my school didn’t know what to do. Let’s change that.

The author with students.

Mayor de Blasio recently announced that last year was the safest on record for New York City schools. While I know that teachers like myself are celebrating this milestone, the fact is that when a violent act does occur in our schools, the city’s guidance and support can be worryingly absent.

This became obvious to me when my eighth-grade student Elijah began acting out following a violent attack. With more specific training, I think my colleagues and I could have done better to help him, instead of isolating him, during his time of need.

When I first met Elijah, a precocious and gregarious teenager, he was always eager to share family photos and lively updates on his newest adventures. We joked about subjects ranging from his sister’s ugly sweater party to their trip to Disney.

But one morning Elijah entered my classroom without his trademark smile. It took some time before he explained how his walk home the day before had been so different from my own.

In a case of mistaken identity, a group of teenagers had shoved Elijah and his cousin to the ground and aimed a gun at their backs. Thankfully, Elijah’s emotional intelligence far surpasses his 13 years, and using his characteristic savvy and charm, he de-escalated the situation and the boys let them go.

While Elijah escaped physically unscathed, scars aren’t always physical. The experience of being attacked stayed with him, and despite our best efforts, my colleagues and I had not learned the skills to help him heal. An aura of gloom became Elijah’s new trademark, and he began acting out.

Without the tools to support students struggling with their emotions, teachers routinely sent Elijah to the “stay back” room, bleakly and aptly named for the space where we are forced to send “troublemakers” in order to continue teaching without disruption. A damaging substitute for the mental health aid these students need, the “stay back” room functions like a holding cell in which teachers become guards for students excluded from the classroom.

It was in this room one day that Elijah and his friend argued. The supervising teacher did not have the tools to de-escalate the dispute, which quickly grew physical. Elijah was suspended for 15 days.

My school’s inability to meet Elijah’s needs isn’t due to a lack of empathy, interest, or investment in its students. Our entire staff cares deeply about Elijah, but individual staff members knew few alternatives to address his behavior besides punitive discipline.

This is true not only at my school, but schools across the city. This May, Educators for Excellence surveyed 2,100 city educators on how best to expand non-punitive practices. Fifty-seven percent identified ongoing training and consistent implementation as the most important factors in that work.

Teachers should learn to use “restorative circles,” a dialoguing tool, to create space for students to express themselves in productive ways and foster a sense of community. They should learn to recognize and defuse conflicts and reintegrate students into the school community when a crisis does occur. With more experience with those techniques, I think we could have both better prevented and managed Elijah’s behavior while helping him grow.

New York City has been promoting these practices, and helping some teachers in some schools get that kind of training. But like many initiatives, it is starting small. I hope all of New York City’s teachers get that chance to learn how to best help students like Elijah.

Melissa Dorcemus is a middle school special education teacher in Manhattan and a member of Educators for Excellence-New York.


Aurora’s superintendent will get a contract extension

Aurora Public Schools Superintendent Rico Munn. (Photo by Andy Cross/The Denver Post)

The Aurora school board is offering superintendent Rico Munn a contract extension.

Marques Ivey, the school board president, made the announcement during Tuesday’s regular board meeting.

“The board of education believes we are headed in the right direction,” Ivey said. Munn can keep the district going in the right direction, he added.

The contract extension has not been approved yet. Munn said Tuesday night that it had been sent to his lawyer, but he had not had time to review it.

Munn took the leadership position in Aurora Public Schools in 2013. His current contract is set to expire at the end of June.

Munn indicated he intends to sign the new contract after he has time to review it. If he does so, district leaders expect the contract to be on the agenda of the board’s next meeting, April 3, for a first review, and then for a vote at the following meeting.

Details about the new offer, including the length of the extension or any salary increases, have not been made public.

Four of the seven members currently on the board were elected in November as part of a union-supported slate. Many voiced disapproval of some of the superintendent’s reform strategies such as his invitation to charter school network DSST to open in Aurora.

In their first major vote as a new board, the board also voted against the superintendent’s recommendation for the turnaround of an elementary school, signaling a disagreement with the district’s turnaround strategies.

But while several Aurora schools remain low performing, last year the district earned a high enough rating from the state to avoid a path toward state action.

cooling off

New York City charter leader Eva Moskowitz says Betsy DeVos is not ‘ready for prime time’

PHOTO: Chalkbeat
Success Academy CEO and founder Eva Moskowitz seemed to be cooling her support for U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.

In New York City, Eva Moskowitz has been a lone voice of support for the controversial U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. But even Moskowitz appears to be cooling on the secretary following an embarrassing interview.

“I believe her heart is in the right place,” Moskowitz, founder and CEO of Success Academy, said of DeVos at an unrelated press conference. “But as the recent interviews indicate, I don’t believe she’s ready for primetime in terms of answering all of the complex questions that need to be answered on the topic of public education and choice.”

That is an apparent reference to DeVos’s roundly criticized appearance on 60 Minutes, which recently aired a 30-minute segment in which the secretary admits she hasn’t visited struggling schools in her tenure. Even advocates of school choice, DeVos’s signature issue, called her performance an “embarrassment,” and “Saturday Night Live” poked fun at her.  

Moskowitz’s comments are an about-face from when the education secretary was first appointed. While the rest of the New York City charter school community was mostly quiet after DeVos was tapped for the position, Moskowitz was the exception, tweeting that she was “thrilled.” She doubled-down on her support months later in an interview with Chalkbeat.

“I believe that education reform has to be a bipartisan issue,” she said.

During Monday’s press conference, which Success Academy officials called to push the city for more space for its growing network, Moskowitz also denied rumors, fueled by a tweet from AFT President Randi Weingarten, that Success officials had recently met with members of the Trump administration.

Shortly after the election, Moskowitz met with Trump amid speculation she was being considered for the education secretary position. This time around, she said it was “untrue” that any visits had taken place.

“You all know that a while back, I was asked to meet with the president-elect. I thought it was important to take his call,” she said. “I was troubled at the time by the Trump administration. I’m even more troubled now. And so, there has been no such meeting.”