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Student shoots self in leg at Walker Middle School

A 13-year-old male student at A. Maceo Walker Middle School accidentally shot himself in the leg this morning, school officials said.

The boy was showing a gun off to his friend at the school when he dropped it, according to several media reports, . The gun went off, striking the boy. He was transported to Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital in stable condition and his mother was issued a juvenile court summons.

Classes continued throughout the day while the police investigated.

This is the second time in the past several days that Walker Middle School has been in the news. Walker was one of a dozen low-performing schools named last week as possible targets for intervention by the state-run Achievement School District.

The ASD has the ability to take over the worst-performing schools in the state, the vast majority of which are located in Memphis.

Once the state takes over a school, it can hand it over to a privately-run charter operator which has the ability to change the school’s name, bring in a new curriculum or change its discipline model.

At A. Maceo Walker, named after a wealthy black Memphis banker, fewer than 18 percent of its students met the state’s math standards last year. Despite $22,000 dollars worth of professional development, the school’s test scores improved just 2 percent since 2012, according to a presentation made to the faculty last week.

The Achievment School District is considering matching the school with Yes Prep, a charter operator founded by ASD’s superintendent, Chris Barbic, and known for its high school graduation rate.

Yes Prep will hold a meeting with the school’s community next Wednesday, Oct. 29 at 5:30 p.m. A decision on the school’s fate will be made by the beginning of December.

Check out our interactive page on the school takeover process.

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